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Valentina Carlile Osteopata
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  • Writer's pictureValentina Carlile DO

Therapy and spasmodic dysphonia


Therapy and spasmodic dysphonia

In cases of spasmodic dysphonia, the therapy of choice is botulinum toxin, which, injected into a muscle, is captured in the nerve endings, causing a release of the muscle itself.

The action of the drug begins two to seven days after inoculation, and reaches the desired effects starting from 2 weeks to a month after it.

Its effect is temporary and this explains why the therapy is repeated every 3-6 months.

The peak of the benefit is perceived for the second, third month after inoculation.


Although this is the therapy of choice, it cannot be exclusive but it is best that it is always accompanied by suitable speech therapy and osteopathic therapy to work on structure and function.

Speech therapy aims to teach the patient strategies to change voiceless sounds to voiced sounds or to articulate sounds in certain ways that make speaking easier, using methods that make airflow more efficient and reduce tension and strain during phonation.

This voice therapy usually lasts 6-8 sessions over 8-10 weeks. Its key elements aim to reduce excessive effort during speaking, strategies for difficult speaking situations such as on the telephone and education about the disorder and its effects, providing a sense of control as patients better understand methods for manage your voice.


Osteopathic therapy aims to reduce and balance the somatic dysfunctions present in a context of excessive effort on the part of the muscles around the larynx. Specifically, laryngeal manipulation, included in a treatment of the entire upper triangle and its structural and neural elements, helps the patient in managing the effort and the speech therapist in inserting the engrams necessary to manage the disorder.


The home and daily practice of speech therapy instructions is very important.


 

Valentina Carlile - Osteopath expert in Osteopathy applied to voice and speech disorders since 2002. For information and reservations visit the page Contacts




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