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Valentina Carlile Osteopata
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  • Writer's pictureValentina Carlile DO

CROSS TAPE: WHAT IS IT, WHAT IS IT FOR, WHO IS IT FOR?

CROSS TAPE: WHAT IS IT, WHAT IS IT FOR, WHO IS IT FOR?

If we say Dr. Aeo Kang and Nobutaka Tanaka we are referring to the Korean Physiatrist and the Japanese Osteopath who respectively invented and developed the Cross Tape (CT) technique, bringing its application from the beginning exclusively to the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine in relation to the muscle tendon meridians, to Western Medicine with application on painful points and on Trigger Points (TPs) which, by influencing the flow of electromagnetic energy of the body, influence the bioelectric balance and the electromagnetic microcurrents that pass through the skin, reconditioning imbalances.


Specifically, the CT is an inelastic, therefore inextensible, and hypoallergenic patch, available in different formats, and configured as a quadrangular mesh (see photo). Made of 80% polyester, it is water resistant, like Kinesiology Tape.


But what exactly is it for?

Despite the scarcity of studies in scientific literature on the topic, there is an important rationale behind its operation.

Once applied, its presence is a stimulus for the cutaneous sensory receptors which transform it into energy transducers which the nervous system then encodes and converts into different response signals, each time activating bioelectrical activity in the area of application.


Among these answers, there are 4 main ones:

• Analgesic effect: produced by the interaction between the CT and nociceptors which helps to deactivate the TPs

• Neuro-reflex effect: through the influence of CT on dermatomes (skin areas responsible for sensations of temperature, pressure and pain)

• Energy rebalancing: through the application of CT on acupuncture points

• Improvement of lymphatic drainage and muscle tone: through skin lifting and reduction of slippage that occurs with the application of CT


The receptors that are therefore affected in the application of CT are: nociceptors; exteroceptors; baroreceptors (Pacini corpuscles); thermoreceptors (Ruffini for heat and Krause for cold); mechanoreceptors (Meissner corpuscles for stretching).


Who is it aimed at?

From what is known to date, CT can be applied to any adult with attention paid to: young children, elderly people with comorbid conditions and pregnant women. In the office they are used daily on patients with temporomandibular joint disorders and with conditions being treated for floor-of-mouth problems.

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